The History Behind Black History Month

This event has a special spot in the month of February and has an interesting history behind this month.

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502nd Air Base Wing

According to the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Black History Month dates back to 1915. Carter G. Woodson, founder of the ASALH and Black History Month, chose the month of February for the observance because it includes the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Tommy Brown/Released)

By Amanda Martin, Staff Writer

Black History month is an annual celebration of achievements of African Americans and remembering their roles in U.S History. According to History.com, every U.S. president has designated the month of February as Black History Month since 1976.

According to History.com, the story of Black History Month began in 1915, half a century after the thirteenth amendment abolished slavery in the United States. According to time.com, Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) in 1915 . This organization would promote studying black history as a discipline and celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans.

According to thoughtco.com, Woodson chose the week of February 7, 1926, for the first Negro History week because it included the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and former slave, Frederick Douglass. He hoped that this week would encourage a better relationship between blacks and whites in the U.S. as well as inspire young African Americans to celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of their ancestors.

Every President in the U.S. has designated February as Black History Month since 1976.”

— History.com